Saturday, September 30, 2017

futurity - questions

 




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New research has uncovered the molecule that stores long-term memories—it’s called calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase, or CaMKII for short.

The discovery of the memory molecule resolves one of the oldest mysteries in neuroscience—how do our brains create and retain long-term memories?

The finding also opens up radically new avenues of brain research. One day, by targeting CaMKII, it may be possible to erase the memories that underlie trauma or drug addiction. Though it would raise serious ethical issues, it might also allow us to change our pasts by wiping out recollections of unhappy experiences.

CaMKII has also been found to play a role in Alzheimer’s disease. It’s never been clear if the illness deletes long-term memories or if they remain present, yet inaccessible to recall. A better understanding of CaMKII might clarify this.

“Just like it’s unimaginable that we could understand cells if we didn’t understand DNA, it’s unimaginable that you can understand memory if you don’t know what molecule stores it,” says John Lisman, chair in neuroscience at Brandeis University, whose lab made the discovery.

A memory may feel abstract or immaterial, but it is actually a biochemical process taking place in the brain. It involves neurons communicating with each other via the “wires” or synapses connecting them.

The pathway an electrochemical signal follows as it continually travels from neuron to synapse to neuron constitutes a memory. Whenever you have that memory, the same pathway gets activated. And the more it’s activated, the more it becomes hardwired into the brain’s circuitry. Eventually, it becomes a long-term memory.

Activation also requires enzymes, molecules that set off chemical reactions. The problem is that these enzymes don’t exist for longer than a week. If a memory is to endure, it would seem that the enzymes would have to remain functioning for years or even decades.

Once the enzymes turn off, one would expect the memories to go with them. “This became a holy grail in neuroscience,” Lisman says. “How can a molecule in your brain serve as a memory? How does nature accomplish this?”











look

 



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If you can see it, it can see you. That’s true of just about anything.

–Margaret Atwood










on dragons and princesses






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We must assume our existence as broadly as we in any way can; everything, even the unheard-of, must be possible in it. That is at bottom the only courage which is demanded of us: to have courage for the most extraordinary, the most singular, and the most inexplicable that we may encounter.
Only he or she who is ready for everything, who excludes nothing, not even the most enigmatical, will live the relation to another as something alive and will wholly expand his or her being.
For if we think of this existence of the individual as a larger or smaller room, it appears evident that most people learn to know only a corner of their room, a place by the window, a strip of floor on which they walk up and down.
Thus, they have a certain security.
And yet that dangerous insecurity is so much more human than that which drives the prisoners in Poe's stories to feel out the shapes of their horrible dungeons and not be strangers to the unspeakable terror of their abode.
We, however, are not prisoners. We have no reason to mistrust our world, for it is not against us.
Has it terrors, they are our terrors; has it abysses, those abysses belong to us; are dangers at hand, we must try to love them.
And if only we arrange our life according to that principle which counsels us that we must always hold to the difficult, then that which now still seems to us the most alien will become what we most trust and find most faithful.
How should we be able to forget those ancient myths about dragons that at the last moment turn into princesses;
perhaps all the dragons of our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us once beautiful and brave.


–Rainer Maria Rilke

Letters to a Young Poet




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Friday, September 29, 2017

impermanence






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Nothing is lost,

nothing is created,

everything is transformed.


—Antoine Lavoisier
1743–1794




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look





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When past and future dissolve there is only You


–Rumi


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when you come to know yourselves

 



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Jesus said, “If those who lead you say to you, ‘See, the kingdom is in the sky,’ then the birds of the sky will precede you. 

If they say to you, ‘It is in the sea,’ then the fish will precede you. 

Rather, the kingdom is inside of you, and it is outside of you. When you come to know yourselves, then you will become known, and you will realize that it is you who are the sons of the living father.
But if you will not know yourselves, you dwell in poverty and it is you who are that poverty."


—The Gnostic Gospel of Thomas


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you are that





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One went to the door of the Beloved and knocked.
A voice asked, 'Who is there?'

He answered, 'It is I.'

The voice said, 'There is no room for Me and Thee.'
The door was shut.

After a year of solitude and deprivation he returned and knocked. A voice from within asked, 'Who is there?'
The man said, 'It is Thee.'
The door was opened for him.


–Jelaluddin Rumi



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revelation





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You are the deep innerness of all things,
the last word that can never be spoken.
To each of us you reveal yourself differently:
to the ship as coastline, to the shore as a ship.


–Rainer Maria Rilke
Trans. by Anita Barrows


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en(lightening





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Enlightenment is like the moon reflected on the water.
The moon does not get wet, nor is the water broken. 
Although its light is wide and great, the moon is reflected even in a puddle an inch wide. The whole moon and the entire sky are reflected in dewdrops on the grass, or even in one drop of water. 

Enlightenment does not divide you, just as the moon does not break the water. You cannot hinder enlightenment, just as a drop of water does not hinder the moon in the sky. 

The depth of the drop is the height of the moon.
Each reflection, however long or short its duration, manifests the vastness of the dewdrop, and realizes the limitlessness of the moonlight in the sky.

–Dogen Zenji (1200 - 1253)



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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

not to worry





💗





not its self





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Consciousness is consciousness of something.
This means that transcendence is the constitutive structure of consciousness; that is, that consciousness emerges supported by a being which is not itself.
 
–Jean-Paul Sartre


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in your body lies a priceless gem





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There is a force within
Which gives you life –
    seek That.

In your body
Lies a priceless gem –
    seek That.

O wandering Sufi,
    if you want to find
    the greatest treasure
    Don’t look outside,
Look inside, and seek That.


–Rumi
Star/Shiva version



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listen





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Listen.

Sit, be still, and listen,
because you’re drunk and we’re at the edge of the roof.


–Rumi


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Tuesday, September 26, 2017

the sea wind





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The sea wind sways over the endless oceans -
spreads its wings night and day
rises and sinks again
over the desolate swaying floor of the immortal ocean.

Now it is nearly morning
or it is nearly evening
and the ocean wind feels in its face - the land wind.

Clockbuoy toll morning and evening psalms,
the smoke of a coalboat
or the smoke of a tar-burning phoenician ship faces away at the horizons.

The lonely jellyfish who has no history rocks around with
burning blue feet.
It's nearly evening now or morning.


–Harry Martinson



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conditions of a solitary bird





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The conditions of a solitary bird are five:

The first, that it flies to the highest point;

the second, that it does not suffer for company,
not even of its own kind;

the third, that it aims its beak to the skies;

the fourth, that it does not have a definite color;

the fifth, that it sings very softly.


–St. John of the Cross



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you know ...





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there is no place at all that is not looking at you.


–Rainer Maria Rilke


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listen





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The flute of the Infinite is played without ceasing, and its sound is Love.

–Kabir

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

question





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It is every intelligent man's experience ... wrong-doing recoils on the doer sooner or later. Why is this so?
Because the Self is one in all.


When seeing others you are only seeing yourself in their shapes.

'Love they neighbor as thyself' means that you should love him because he is your Self.


–Ramana Maharshi
S. S. Cohen, 15th August, 1948



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every(thing






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Start seeing everything as God,

But keep it a secret.


–Hafiz


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Thursday, September 21, 2017

tell me a story






💗





I don’t know any longer whether I’m living or remembering. –Albert Camus






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In Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective novel A Study in Scarlet (1887) we learn that Sherlock Holmes used the most effective memory system known: a memory palace. Although imagined memory palaces are still used by memory champions and the few who practice the memory arts, they are best known from Greco-Roman times when great orators, including Cicero, used them to ensure their rhetoric was smooth, detailed and flawless. The physical memory palace, usually a streetscape or building interior, would become so familiar to the orator that it was always available to them in their imagination. By ‘placing’ one piece of information in each site, they could mentally stroll through their memory palace, location by location, drawing out each portion of the speech in the required order without missing any element.

Received opinion is that this method of loci, as the technique is also known, dates to before Simonides of Ceos (c556-468 BCE), who is often credited as the inventor. However there is ample circumstantial evidence that indigenous cultures the world over have been using it for far longer than that. There is a continuous record dating back at least 40,000 years for Australian Aboriginal cultures. Their songlines, along with Native American pilgrimage trails, Pacific Islanders’ ceremonial roads and the ceque system of the Inca at Cusco all exhibit exactly the same pattern as the memory palaces described by Cicero. At each sacred location along these paths, elders would sing, dance or tell a story, all making the information associated with the location more memorable.

The memory skills of indigenous elders exceed anything reported for the ancient Greeks. Research with the Native American Navajo people, for example, shows that they memorise a classification of more than 700 insects along with identification, habitats and behaviour. And that’s just insects. A fully initiated indigenous elder would be able to relate stories equivalent to a field guide for all the birds, mammals, reptiles, fish and hundreds of insects within their environment.

Another study shows that the Hanunoo people of the Philippines were able to identify 1,625 plants, many of which were unknown to Western science at the time. Add to that knowledge of astronomy, timekeeping, navigation, legal and ethical guidelines, weather and seasons, complex genealogies and belief systems, and you have a vast encyclopaedia stored in an interwoven memorised web: a web that is tied to a real or imagined memory palace.

Cultures without writing are referred to as ‘non-literate’, but their identity should not be associated with what they don’t do, but rather with what they do from necessity when there is no writing to record their knowledge. Cultures without writing employ the most intriguing range of memory technologies often linked under the academic term ‘primary orality’, including song, dance, rhyme and rhythm, and story and mythology. Physical memory devices, though, are less often included in this list. The most universal of these is the landscape itself.

Australian Aboriginal memory palaces are spread across the land, structured by sung pathways referred to as songlines. The songlines of the Yanyuwa people from Carpentaria in Australia’s far north have been recorded over 800 kilometres. A songline is a sequence of locations, that might, for example, include the rocks that provide the best materials for tools, to a significant tree or a waterhole. They are far more than a navigation aid. At each location, a song or story, dance or ceremony is performed that will always be associated with that particular location, physically and in memory. A songline, then, provides a table of contents to the entire knowledge system, one that can be traversed in memory as well as physically.

Enmeshed with the vitalised landscape, some indigenous cultures also use the skyscape as a memory device; the stories of the characters associated with the stars, planets and dark spaces recall invaluable practical knowledge such as seasonal variations, navigation, timekeeping and much of the ethical framework for their culture. The stories associated with the location in the sky or across the landscape provide a grounded structure to add ever more complexity with levels of initiation. Typically, only a fully initiated elder would know and understand the entire knowledge system of the community. By keeping critical information sacred and restricted, the so-called ‘Chinese whispers effect’ could be avoided, protecting information from corruption.

Rock art and decorated posts are also familiar aids to indigenous memory, but far less known is the range of portable memory devices. Incised stones and boards, collections of objects in bags, bark paintings, birchbark scrolls, decorations on skins and the knotted cords of the Inca khipu have all been used to aid the recall of memorised information. The food-carrying dish used by Australian Aboriginal cultures, the coolamon, can be incised on the back, providing a sophisticated mnemonic device without adding anything more to the load to be carried when moving around their landscape. Similarly, the tjuringa, a stone or wooden object up to a metre long decorated with abstract motifs, is a highly restricted device for Aboriginal men. As the owner of the coolamon or the elder with his tjuringa touched each marking, he or she would recall the appropriate story or sing the related song.

This is very similar to the way the Luba people of West Africa use a well-documented memory board known as a lukasa. Previous researchers have claimed that the ‘men of memory’ of the Mbudye society would spend years learning a vast corpus of stories, dances and songs associated with the bead and shells attached to a piece of carved wood. My initial attitude when I read this was complete skepticism. It was surely claiming far too much for such a simple device. So I made one. I grabbed a piece of wood and glued some beads and shells on it and started encoding the 412 birds of my state: their scientific family names, identification, habitats and behaviour. It worked a treat. I no longer doubt the research. Though simple, this is an incredibly powerful memory tool. Inspired by my success with the lukasa, I have also created songlines for more than a kilometre around my home. I have a location on my walk for each of the 244 countries and dependent territories in the world. I walk through them from the most populous in China to little Pitcairn Island. I also walk through time from 4,500 million years ago until the present, nodding to the dinosaurs, meeting our hominid ancestors and greeting numerous characters from history. My memory has been hugely expanded by using this ancient mnemonic technique.

It is the structure of the human brain that dictates the memory methods that work so effectively right across human societies. It is our dependence on writing that has eroded this skill. We can, if we choose to, implement these techniques alongside our current educational methods. I have taught schoolchildren to sing their science and to create memory trails right around the school grounds, with excellent results. We can and should learn from the intellectual achievements of indigenous cultures by adapting their techniques to contemporary life. But when we do this, we should acknowledge the source. These memory techniques are far older than our Western civilisation, and they are far more effective than the crude rote techniques that replaced them.
–Lynne Kelly












closer than breathing






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You darkness, that I come from,
I love you more than all the fires
that fence in the world,
for the fire makes
a circle of light for everyone,
and then no one outside learns of you.

But the darkness pulls in everything:
shapes and fires, animals and myself,
how easily it gathers them! —
powers and people —

and it is possible a great energy
is moving near me.

I have faith in nights.


—Rainier Maria Rilke
Robert Bly version









Tuesday, September 19, 2017

No Title Required






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It has come to this: I'm sitting under a tree
beside a river
on a sunny morning.
It's an insignificant event
and won't go down in history.
It's not battles and pacts,
where motives are scrutinized,
or noteworthy tyrannicides.

And yet I'm sitting by this river, that's a fact.
And since I'm here
I must have come from somewhere,
and before that
I must have turned up in many other places,
exactly like the conquerors of nations
before setting sail.

Even a passing moment has its fertile past,
its Friday before Saturday,
its May before June.
Its horizons are no less real
than those that a marshal's field glasses might scan.

This tree is a poplar that's been rooted here for years.
The river is the Raba; it didn't spring up yesterday.
The path leading through the bushes
wasn't beaten last week.
The wind had to blow the clouds here
before it could blow them away.

And though nothing much is going on nearby,
the world is no poorer in details for that.
It's just as grounded, just as definite
as when migrating races held it captive.

Conspiracies aren't the only things shrouded in silence.
Retinues of reasons don't trail coronations alone.
Anniversaries of revolutions may roll around,
but so do oval pebbles encircling the bay.

The tapestry of circumstance is intricate and dense.
Ants stitching in the grass.
The grass sewn into the ground.
The pattern of a wave being needled by a twig.

So it happens that I am and look.
Above me a white butterfly is fluttering through the air
on wings that are its alone,
and a shadow skims through my hands
that is none other than itself, no one else's but its own.

When I see such things, I'm no longer sure
that what's important
is more important than what's not.

–Wislawa Szymborska
S. Baranczak and C. Cavanagh translation




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Sunday, September 17, 2017

dearest god particle






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3:6:9
“If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe.” - N.Tesla


Perhaps Tesla had in mind another thing altogether. It basically boiled down to energy/field/consciousness, which equates in to electricity /magnetism/ consciousness, that made up Trinity. Energy is your divine spark, and field is the area you exist within. The 2 things that allow consciousness to isolate itself is electricity and magnetism. NOTHING in the physical universe exists outside energy and field, only then can you have consciousness reside inside a material existence. 3:6:9. Perhaps these numbers were intentionally expressed by the pyramids of Giza? There are 9 pyramids on the Giza plateau: 3 large pyramids and 6 small “satellite” pyramids. Also, the design of the Second (Khafre) Pyramid of Giza is based on ratio 9:6.

 

The Fibonacci series has a pattern that repeats every 24 numbers

Numeric reduction is a technique used in analysis of numbers in which all the digits of a number are added together until only one digit remains. As an example, the numeric reduction of 256 is 4 because 2+5+6=13 and 1+3=4. Applying numeric reduction to the Fibonacci series produces an infinite series of 24 repeating digits:1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 4, 3, 7, 1, 8, 9, 8, 8, 7, 6, 4, 1, 5, 6, 2, 8, 1, 9. If you take the first 12 digits and add them to the second twelve digits and apply numeric reduction to the result, you find that they all have a value of 9.

Marko Rodin and God’s Particle


Marko Rodin has indeed discovered natures secret about 3,6, and 9.
“We have to cast out all 9’s.” What does that mean? It means that any number that is above the value 9 or one place value is going to be added together to get a single digit. So this means if we have a number 26, we add 2+6 to get 8, which is its “archetype”. If we do this for all numbers while doubling and halving, we get a pattern. The secret to the Universe is DOUBLING and HALVING. So, number 9 is the unchanging, unwavering number that never really loses its true identity, even though it is undergoing a constant state changing.

Marko Rodin found the math to the real “God Particle” or particle of Spirit, known as Brahman in the Vedas, and he has shown how it can be observed, but not with physical instruments.



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this path to god







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This
Path to God
Made me such an old sweet beggar.

I was starving until one night
My love tricked God Himself
To fall into my bowl.

Now Hafiz is infinitely rich,
But all I ever want to do

Is keep emptying out
My emerald-filled
Pockets

Upon
This tear-stained
World.


Hafiz


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Haikudikter, excerpt







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The presence of God.
In a tunnel of birdsong
a locked gate opens.

–Tomas Tranströmer
The Sorrow Gondola

Michael McGriff, Mikaela Grassl translation


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Saturday, September 16, 2017

question







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Are we not at peace in the interval when one thought ceases and another does not yet arise?


–Ramana Maharshi


...


Whenever you entrust your heart to a thought,
something will be taken from you inwardly
Whatever you think and acquire, the thief will
enter from that side where you feel safe
So busy yourself with that which is better, so
that something less may be taken from you.


–Rumi
Mathnawi II:1505-1507
William Chittick translation



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the highest form of thought





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I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.

—G. K. Chesterton


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Of Bright & Blue Birds & The Gala Sun






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Some things, niño, some things are like this,
That instantly and in themselves are gay
And you and I are such things, O most miserable...

For a moment they are gay and are a part
Of an element, the exactest element for us,
In which we pronounce joy like a word of our own.

It is there, being imperfect, and with these things
And erudite in happiness, with nothing learned,
That we are joyously ourselves and we think

Without the labor of thought, in that element,
And we feel, in a way apart, for a moment, as if
There was a bright scienza outside of ourselves,

A gaiety that is being, not merely knowing,
The will to be and to be total in belief,
Provoking a laughter, an agreement, by surprise.



Wallace Stevens


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